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dc.contributor.authorKirke, A
dc.contributor.authorWilliams, D
dc.contributor.authorMiranda, E
dc.contributor.authorBluglass, A
dc.contributor.authorWhyte, C
dc.contributor.authorPruthi, R
dc.contributor.authorEccleston, A
dc.date.accessioned2018-03-08T11:03:45Z
dc.date.available2018-03-08T11:03:45Z
dc.date.issued2018-07-03
dc.identifier.issn1462-6268
dc.identifier.issn1744-3806
dc.identifier.other2-3
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10026.1/11022
dc.description.abstract

© 2018 Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor & Francis Group ‘Many worlds’ is a short narrative live-action film written and directed so as to provide multiple linear routes through the plot to one of four endings, and designed for showing in a cinema environment. At two points during the film, decisions are made based on audience bio-signals as to which plot route to take. The use of bio-signals is to allow the audience to remain immersed in the film, rather than explicitly selecting plot direction. Four audience members have a bio-signal measured sensor for each person: ECG (heart rate), EMG (muscle tension), EEG (‘brain waves’) and Galvanic Skin Response (perspiration). The four are interpreted as a single average of emotional arousal. ‘Many worlds’ was the first live-action linear plotted film to be screened in a cinema to the general public utilizing multiple biosensor types. The film has been shown publically a number of times, and lessons learned from the technical and cinematic production are detailed in this paper.

dc.format.extent1-17
dc.languageen
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherTaylor & Francis (Routledge)
dc.subjectBio-signal monitoring
dc.subjectimmersive interaction
dc.subjectinteractive cinema
dc.subjectmovies
dc.subjectemotion
dc.titleUnconsciously interactive Films in a cinema environment—a demonstrative case study
dc.typejournal-article
dc.typeArticle
plymouth.issue2-3
plymouth.volume29
plymouth.publication-statusAccepted
plymouth.journalDigital Creativity
dc.identifier.doi10.1080/14626268.2017.1407344
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Faculty of Arts, Humanities and Business
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Faculty of Arts, Humanities and Business/School of Society and Culture
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/REF 2021 Researchers by UoA
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/REF 2021 Researchers by UoA/UoA33 Music, Drama, Dance, Performing Arts, Film and Screen Studies
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Users by role
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Users by role/Academics
dcterms.dateAccepted2017-10-23
dc.rights.embargodate2019-8-12
dc.identifier.eissn1744-3806
dc.rights.embargoperiodNot known
rioxxterms.versionofrecord10.1080/14626268.2017.1407344
rioxxterms.licenseref.urihttp://www.rioxx.net/licenses/all-rights-reserved
rioxxterms.typeJournal Article/Review


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