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dc.contributor.authorJeffers, E
dc.contributor.authorWhitehouse, NJ
dc.contributor.authorLister, A
dc.contributor.authorPlunkett, G
dc.contributor.authorBarratt, P
dc.contributor.authorSmyth, E
dc.contributor.authorLamb, P
dc.contributor.authorDee, M
dc.contributor.authorBrooks, S
dc.contributor.authorWillis, K
dc.contributor.authorFroyd, C
dc.contributor.authorWatson, J
dc.contributor.authorBonsall, M
dc.date.accessioned2018-02-24T16:07:29Z
dc.date.accessioned2018-02-24T16:12:56Z
dc.date.available2018-02-24T16:07:29Z
dc.date.issued2018-06
dc.identifier.issn1461-023X
dc.identifier.issn1461-0248
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10026.1/10853
dc.description.abstract

Plants and animals influence biomass production and nutrient cycling in terrestrial ecosystems; however their relative importance remains unclear. We assessed the extent to which megaherbivore species controlled plant community composition and nutrient cycling, relative to other factors during and after the Late Quaternary extinction event in Britain and Ireland, when two-thirds of the region’s mega-herbivore species went extinct. Warmer temperatures, plant-soil and plantplant interactions, and reduced burning contributed to the expansion of woody plants and declining nitrogen availability in our five study ecosystems. Shrub biomass in particular was consistently one of the strongest predictors of ecosystem change, equaling or exceeding the effects of other biotic and abiotic factors. In contrast, there was relatively little evidence for mega-herbivore control on plant community composition and nitrogen availability. The ability of plants to determine the fate of terrestrial ecosystems during periods of global environmental change may therefore be greater than previously thought.

dc.format.extent814-825
dc.format.mediumPrint-Electronic
dc.languageen
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherWiley
dc.relation.replaceshttp://hdl.handle.net/10026.1/10852
dc.relation.replaces10026.1/10852
dc.subjectClimate change
dc.subjectlandscape burning
dc.subjectmegafauna extinction
dc.subjectnutrient cycling
dc.subjectplant community composition
dc.subjectplant-plant interactions
dc.subjectplant-soil interactions
dc.titlePlant controls on Late Quaternary whole ecosystem structure and function
dc.typejournal-article
dc.typeArticle
plymouth.author-urlhttps://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/29601664
plymouth.issue6
plymouth.volume21
plymouth.publication-statusPublished
plymouth.journalEcology Letters
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/ele.12944
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Admin Group - Faculty
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Admin Group - Faculty/Admin Group - FoH
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Faculty of Health
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Faculty of Science and Engineering
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/REF 2021 Researchers by UoA
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/REF 2021 Researchers by UoA/UoA14 Geography and Environmental Studies
dc.publisher.placeEngland
dcterms.dateAccepted2018-02-12
dc.rights.embargodate2019-3-30
dc.identifier.eissn1461-0248
dc.rights.embargoperiodNot known
rioxxterms.versionofrecord10.1111/ele.12944
rioxxterms.licenseref.urihttp://www.rioxx.net/licenses/all-rights-reserved
rioxxterms.licenseref.startdate2018-06
rioxxterms.typeJournal Article/Review


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