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dc.contributor.authorConstantino, Cen
dc.contributor.authorGardner, Men
dc.contributor.authorComber, SDWen
dc.contributor.authorScrimshaw, MDen
dc.contributor.authorEllor, Ben
dc.date.accessioned2018-01-09T08:31:34Z
dc.date.available2018-01-09T08:31:34Z
dc.date.issued2015en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10026.1/10499
dc.description.abstract

Tightening quality standards for European waters has seen a move towards enhanced wastewater treatment technologies such as granulated organic carbon treatment and ozonation. Although these technologies are likely to be successful in degrading certain micro-organic contaminants, these may also destroy compounds which would otherwise complex and render metals significantly less toxic. This study examined the impact of enhanced tertiary treatment on the capacity of organic compounds within sewage effluents to complex copper and zinc. The data show that granulated organic carbon treatment removes a dissolved organic carbon (DOC) fraction that is unimportant to complexation such that no detrimental impact on complexation or metal bioavailability is likely to occur from this treatment type. High concentrations of ozone (>1 mg O3/mg DOC) are, however, likely to impact the complexation capacity for copper although this is unlikely to be important at the concentrations of copper typically found in effluent discharges or in rivers. Ozone treatment did not affect zinc complexation capacity. The complexation profiles of the sewage effluents show these to contain a category of non-humic ligand that appears unaffected by tertiary treatment and which displays a high affinity for zinc, suggesting these may substantially reduce the bioavailability of zinc in effluent discharges. The implication is that traditional metal bioavailability assessment approaches such as the biotic ligand model may overestimate zinc bioavailability in sewage effluents and effluent-impacted waters.

en
dc.format.extent2863 - 2871en
dc.languageengen
dc.language.isoengen
dc.subjectcopperen
dc.subjecteffluenten
dc.subjectgranular activated carbon treatmenten
dc.subjectmetal speciationen
dc.subjectozoneen
dc.subjectzincen
dc.subjectCarbonen
dc.subjectCopperen
dc.subjectWaste Wateren
dc.subjectWater Pollutants, Chemicalen
dc.subjectZincen
dc.titleThe impact of tertiary wastewater treatment on copper and zinc complexation.en
dc.typeJournal Article
plymouth.author-urlhttps://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26052740en
plymouth.issue22en
plymouth.volume36en
plymouth.publication-statusPublisheden
plymouth.journalEnviron Technolen
dc.identifier.doi10.1080/09593330.2015.1050072en
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/00 Groups by role
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/00 Groups by role/Academics
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Faculty of Science and Engineering
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Faculty of Science and Engineering/School of Geography, Earth and Environmental Sciences
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/REF 2021 Researchers by UoA
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/REF 2021 Researchers by UoA/UoA06 Agriculture, Veterinary and Food Science
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Research Groups
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Research Groups/BEACh
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Research Groups/Marine Institute
dc.publisher.placeEnglanden
dc.identifier.eissn1479-487Xen
dc.rights.embargoperiodNot knownen
rioxxterms.versionofrecord10.1080/09593330.2015.1050072en
rioxxterms.licenseref.urihttp://www.rioxx.net/licenses/all-rights-reserveden
rioxxterms.typeJournal Article/Reviewen


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