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dc.contributor.authorWakabayashi, R
dc.contributor.authorKusunoki, Y
dc.contributor.authorHattori, K
dc.contributor.authorMotegi, T
dc.contributor.authorFurutate, R
dc.contributor.authorItoh, A
dc.contributor.authorJones, RCM
dc.contributor.authorHyland, ME
dc.contributor.authorKida, K
dc.date.accessioned2018-01-02T13:29:24Z
dc.date.issued2018-01-17
dc.identifier.issn1444-1586
dc.identifier.issn1447-0594
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10026.1/10468
dc.description.abstract

<jats:sec><jats:title>Aim</jats:title><jats:p>To determine whether home‐based exercise can improve clinical outcomes in older patients with advanced chronic obstructive pulmonary disease using long‐term oxygen therapy.</jats:p></jats:sec><jats:sec><jats:title>Methods</jats:title><jats:p>Information was provided to improve chronic obstructive pulmonary disease self‐management before the onset of the present prospective 3‐year cohort study. Patients selected either home‐based exercise using a lower‐limb cycle machine (ergo‐bicycle; group E), or usual exercise (group U). To assess self‐management, the Lung Information Needs Questionnaire was evaluated every 6 months. Clinical outcomes included the 6‐min walk test, pulmonary function tests, the body mass index, airflow obstruction, dyspnea and exercise index, St. George's respiratory questionnaire, and the number of exacerbations and hospitalizations.</jats:p></jats:sec><jats:sec><jats:title>Results</jats:title><jats:p>A total of 136 patients (group E = 72; group U = 64), with a mean age of 74.2 years were enrolled. Total Lung Information Needs Questionnaire scores improved over 3 years for group E (<jats:italic>P</jats:italic> = 0.003). The distance of the 6‐min walk test was well maintained in group E, but significantly decreased in group U (<jats:italic>P</jats:italic> &lt; 0.001). The percentage of forced expiratory volume in 1 s at baseline was lower in group E (<jats:italic>P</jats:italic> = 0.016), but was maintained over 3 years, whereas a significant reduction was seen in group U (<jats:italic>P</jats:italic> = 0.001). The body mass index, airflow obstruction, dyspnea and exercise index significantly worsened in both groups over 3 years (group E: <jats:italic>P</jats:italic> = 0.011; group U: <jats:italic>P</jats:italic> &lt; 0.001), whereas a significant decrease in the number of exacerbations was noted in group E (<jats:italic>P</jats:italic> = 0.009).</jats:p></jats:sec><jats:sec><jats:title>Conclusions</jats:title><jats:p>Patients who undertook home‐based exercise using an ergo‐bicycle were able to maintain clinical outcomes including 6‐min walk test distance and percentage of forced expiratory volume in 1 s predicted, and recorded fewer exacerbations over 3 years. <jats:bold>Geriatr Gerontol Int 2018; 18: 42–49</jats:bold>.</jats:p></jats:sec>

dc.format.extent42-49
dc.format.mediumPrint-Electronic
dc.languageen
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherWiley
dc.subjectchronic obstructive pulmonary disease
dc.subjecthome-based exercise
dc.subjectlong-term oxygen therapy
dc.subjectpatient education
dc.subjectself-management
dc.titleEffectiveness of home-based exercise in older patients with advanced chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: A 3-year cohort study
dc.typejournal-article
dc.typeArticle
plymouth.author-urlhttps://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28762596
plymouth.issue1
plymouth.volume18
plymouth.publisher-urlhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1111/ggi.13134
plymouth.publication-statusPublished online
plymouth.journalGeriatrics & Gerontology International
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/ggi.13134
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Faculty of Health
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/REF 2021 Researchers by UoA
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/REF 2021 Researchers by UoA/UoA03 Allied Health Professions, Dentistry, Nursing and Pharmacy
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/REF 2021 Researchers by UoA/UoA03 Allied Health Professions, Dentistry, Nursing and Pharmacy/UoA03 Allied Health Professions, Dentistry, Nursing and Pharmacy MANUAL
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Research Groups
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Research Groups/Centre for Brain, Cognition and Behaviour (CBCB)
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Research Groups/Centre for Brain, Cognition and Behaviour (CBCB)/Behaviour
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Research Groups/FoH - Community and Primary Care
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Research Groups/Institute of Health and Community
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Research Groups/Institute of Translational and Stratified Medicine (ITSMED)
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Research Groups/Institute of Translational and Stratified Medicine (ITSMED)/CCT&PS
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Users by role
dc.publisher.placeJapan
dcterms.dateAccepted2017-06-13
dc.rights.embargodate2018-8-1
dc.identifier.eissn1447-0594
dc.rights.embargoperiodNot known
rioxxterms.versionofrecord10.1111/ggi.13134
rioxxterms.licenseref.urihttp://www.rioxx.net/licenses/all-rights-reserved
rioxxterms.licenseref.startdate2018-01-17
rioxxterms.typeJournal Article/Review


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