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dc.contributor.authorRochais, Cen
dc.contributor.authorHenry, Sen
dc.contributor.authorFureix, Cen
dc.contributor.authorHausberger, Men
dc.date.accessioned2017-12-12T17:58:12Z
dc.date.available2017-12-12T17:58:12Z
dc.date.issued2016-03en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10026.1/10413
dc.description.abstract

Some captive/domestic animals respond to confinement by becoming inactive and unresponsive to external stimuli. Human inactivity is one of the behavioural markers of clinical depression, a mental disorder diagnosed by the co-occurrence of symptoms including deficit in selective attention. Some riding horses display 'withdrawn' states of inactivity and low responsiveness to stimuli that resemble the reduced engagement with their environment of some depressed patients. We hypothesized that 'withdrawn' horses experience a depressive-like state and evaluated their level of attention by confronting them with auditory stimuli. Five novel auditory stimuli were broadcasted to 27 horses, including 12 'withdrawn' horses, for 5 days. The horses' reactions and durations of attention were recorded. Non-withdrawn horses reacted more and their attention lasted longer than that of withdrawn horses on the first day, but their durations of attention decreased over days, but those of withdrawn horses remained stable. These results suggest that the withdrawn horses' selective attention is altered, adding to already evidenced common features between this horses' state and human depression.

en
dc.format.extent93 - 96en
dc.languageengen
dc.language.isoengen
dc.subjectAttentionen
dc.subjectCognitionen
dc.subjectDepressionen
dc.subjectHorsesen
dc.subjectWelfareen
dc.subjectAcoustic Stimulationen
dc.subjectAnimal Husbandryen
dc.subjectAnimalsen
dc.subjectAttentionen
dc.subjectBehavior, Animalen
dc.subjectCognitionen
dc.subjectDepressionen
dc.subjectHorse Diseasesen
dc.subjectHorsesen
dc.titleInvestigating attentional processes in depressive-like domestic horses (Equus caballus).en
dc.typeJournal Article
plymouth.author-urlhttps://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26739514en
plymouth.volume124en
plymouth.publication-statusPublisheden
plymouth.journalBehav Processesen
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.beproc.2015.12.010en
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/00 Groups by role
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/00 Groups by role/Academics
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Faculty of Health and Human Sciences
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Faculty of Health and Human Sciences/School of Psychology
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Faculty of Science and Engineering
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Faculty of Science and Engineering/School of Biological and Marine Sciences
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/REF 2021 Researchers by UoA
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/REF 2021 Researchers by UoA/UoA04 Psychology, Psychiatry and Neuroscience
dc.publisher.placeNetherlandsen
dcterms.dateAccepted2015-12-22en
dc.identifier.eissn1872-8308en
dc.rights.embargoperiodNot knownen
rioxxterms.versionofrecord10.1016/j.beproc.2015.12.010en
rioxxterms.licenseref.urihttp://www.rioxx.net/licenses/all-rights-reserveden
rioxxterms.licenseref.startdate2016-03en
rioxxterms.typeJournal Article/Reviewen


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