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dc.contributor.authorMarch, DS
dc.contributor.authorMarchbank, T
dc.contributor.authorPlayford, RJ
dc.contributor.authorJones, AW
dc.contributor.authorThatcher, R
dc.contributor.authorDavison, G
dc.date.accessioned2017-12-05T10:01:07Z
dc.date.available2017-12-05T10:01:07Z
dc.date.issued2017-05
dc.identifier.issn1439-6319
dc.identifier.issn1439-6327
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10026.1/10364
dc.description.abstract

PURPOSE: Intestinal cell damage due to physiological stressors (e.g. heat, oxidative, hypoperfusion/ischaemic) may contribute to increased intestinal permeability. The aim of this study was to assess changes in plasma intestinal fatty acid-binding protein (I-FABP) in response to exercise (with bovine colostrum supplementation, Col, positive control) and compare this to intestinal barrier integrity/permeability (5 h urinary lactulose/rhamnose ratio, L/R). METHODS: In a double-blind, placebo-controlled, crossover design, 18 males completed two experimental arms (14 days of 20 g/day supplementation with Col or placebo, Plac). For each arm participants performed two baseline (resting) intestinal permeability assessments (L/R) pre-supplementation and one post-exercise following supplementation. Blood samples were collected pre- and post-exercise to determine I-FABP concentration. RESULTS: Two-way repeated measures ANOVA revealed an arm × time interaction for L/R and I-FABP (P < 0.001). Post hoc analyses showed urinary L/R increased post-exercise in Plac (273% of pre, P < 0.001) and Col (148% of pre, P < 0.001) with post-exercise values significantly lower with Col (P < 0.001). Plasma I-FABP increased post-exercise in Plac (191% of pre-exercise, P = 0.002) but not in the Col arm (107%, P = 0.862) with post-exercise values significantly lower with Col (P = 0.013). Correlations between the increase in I-FABP and L/R were evident for visit one (P = 0.044) but not visit two (P = 0.200) although overall plots/patterns do appear similar for each. CONCLUSION: These findings suggest that exercise-induced intestinal cellular damage/injury is partly implicated in changes in permeability but other factors must also contribute.

dc.format.extent931-941
dc.format.mediumPrint-Electronic
dc.languageen
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherSpringer Science and Business Media LLC
dc.subjectStrenuous exercise
dc.subjectIntestinal permeability
dc.subjectCore temperature
dc.subjectBovine colostrum
dc.subjectCell damage
dc.subjectCellular injury
dc.subjectUrinary L/R
dc.titleIntestinal fatty acid-binding protein and gut permeability responses to exercise
dc.typejournal-article
dc.typeArticle
plymouth.author-urlhttps://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28290057
plymouth.issue5
plymouth.volume117
plymouth.publisher-urlhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00421-017-3582-4
plymouth.publication-statusPublished
plymouth.journalEuropean Journal of Applied Physiology
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/s00421-017-3582-4
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Faculty of Health
dc.publisher.placeGermany
dcterms.dateAccepted2017-02-26
dc.identifier.eissn1439-6327
dc.rights.embargoperiodNot known
rioxxterms.versionofrecord10.1007/s00421-017-3582-4
rioxxterms.licenseref.urihttp://www.rioxx.net/licenses/all-rights-reserved
rioxxterms.licenseref.startdate2017-05
rioxxterms.typeJournal Article/Review


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