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dc.contributor.authorBach, P
dc.contributor.authorPeatfield, NA
dc.contributor.authorTipper, SP
dc.date.accessioned2012-05-24T12:21:33Z
dc.date.available2012-05-24T12:21:33Z
dc.date.issued2007-04-02
dc.identifier.issn0014-4819
dc.identifier.issn1432-1106
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10026.1/1018
dc.description.abstract

Humans use the same representations to code self-produced and observed actions. Neurophysiological evidence for this view comes from the discovery of the so-called mirror neurons in premotor cortex of the macaque monkey. These neurons respond when the monkey performs a particular action but also when it observes the same behavior in another individual. In humans, such direct links between perception and action seem to mediate action priming, where a response is facilitated when a similar action is observed. An issue that has not been fully resolved concerns the role of selective attention in these processes. Action priming appears to be an automatic process in the sense that the observed action can be irrelevant to the observer's task and nevertheless prime similar responses. However, it is not known whether attention has to be oriented to the action for these processes to be engaged. It is demonstrated here that spatial attention indeed has to be oriented to the action related body site for action priming to take place. Furthermore, if attention is oriented to the appropriate body site, there need be no visual cues to action for action priming to emerge.

dc.format.extent509-517
dc.format.mediumPrint-Electronic
dc.languageen
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherSpringer Science and Business Media LLC
dc.subjectAccommodation, Ocular
dc.subjectAdolescent
dc.subjectAdult
dc.subjectAnalysis of Variance
dc.subjectAttention
dc.subjectFemale
dc.subjectHuman Body
dc.subjectHumans
dc.subjectImitative Behavior
dc.subjectMale
dc.subjectPhotic Stimulation
dc.subjectPsychomotor Performance
dc.subjectReaction Time
dc.subjectSpace Perception
dc.titleFocusing on body sites: the role of spatial attention in action perception
dc.typejournal-article
dc.typeArticle
plymouth.author-urlhttps://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17091293
plymouth.issue4
plymouth.volume178
plymouth.publisher-urlhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00221-006-0756-4
plymouth.publication-statusPublished
plymouth.journalExperimental Brain Research
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/s00221-006-0756-4
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/REF 2021 Researchers by UoA
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/REF 2021 Researchers by UoA/UoA04 Psychology, Psychiatry and Neuroscience
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Research Groups
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Research Groups/Centre for Brain, Cognition and Behaviour (CBCB)
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Research Groups/Centre for Brain, Cognition and Behaviour (CBCB)/Brain
dc.publisher.placeGermany
dcterms.dateAccepted2006-10-09
dc.identifier.eissn1432-1106
dc.rights.embargoperiodNot known
rioxxterms.versionofrecord10.1007/s00221-006-0756-4
rioxxterms.licenseref.urihttp://www.rioxx.net/licenses/all-rights-reserved
rioxxterms.licenseref.startdate2007-04
rioxxterms.typeJournal Article/Review


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