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dc.contributor.authorBach, P
dc.contributor.authorPeelen, MV
dc.contributor.authorTipper, SP
dc.date.accessioned2012-05-24T12:20:28Z
dc.date.available2012-05-24T12:20:28Z
dc.date.issued2010-03-15
dc.identifier.issn1460-2199
dc.identifier.issn1460-2199
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10026.1/1016
dc.description.abstract

Observing other people's actions activates a network of brain regions that is also activated during the execution of these actions. Here, we used functional magnetic resonance imaging to test whether these "mirror" regions in frontal and parietal cortices primarily encode the spatiomotor aspects or the functional goal-related aspects of observed tool actions. Participants viewed static depictions of actions consisting of a tool object (e.g., key) and a target object (e.g., keyhole). They judged the actions either with regard to whether the objects were oriented correctly for the action to succeed (spatiomotor task) or whether an action goal could be achieved with the objects (function task). Compared with a control condition, both tasks activated regions in left frontoparietal cortex previously implicated in action observation and execution. Of these regions, the premotor cortex and supramarginal gyrus were primarily activated during the spatiomotor task, whereas the middle frontal gyrus was primarily activated during the function task. Regions along the intraparietal sulcus were more strongly activated during the spatiomotor task but only when the spatiomotor properties of the tool object were unknown in advance. These results suggest a division of labor within the action observation network that maps onto a similar division previously proposed for action execution.

dc.format.extent2798-2809
dc.format.mediumPrint-Electronic
dc.languageENG
dc.language.isoENG
dc.publisherOxford University Press (OUP)
dc.subjectintraparietal sulcus
dc.subjectmiddle frontal gyrus
dc.subjectmirror neurons
dc.subjectpremotor cortex
dc.subjecttool use
dc.titleOn the Role of Object Information in Action Observation: An fMRI Study.
dc.typejournal-article
dc.typeArticle
plymouth.author-urlhttps://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20231266
plymouth.issue12
plymouth.volume20
plymouth.publisher-urlhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1093/cercor/bhq026
plymouth.publication-statusPublished
plymouth.journalCerebral Cortex
dc.identifier.doi10.1093/cercor/bhq026
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/REF 2021 Researchers by UoA
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/REF 2021 Researchers by UoA/UoA04 Psychology, Psychiatry and Neuroscience
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Research Groups
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Research Groups/Centre for Brain, Cognition and Behaviour (CBCB)
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Research Groups/Centre for Brain, Cognition and Behaviour (CBCB)/Brain
dc.publisher.placeUnited States
dc.identifier.eissn1460-2199
dc.rights.embargoperiodNot known
rioxxterms.versionofrecord10.1093/cercor/bhq026
rioxxterms.licenseref.urihttp://www.rioxx.net/licenses/all-rights-reserved
rioxxterms.typeJournal Article/Review


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