Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorTang, L
dc.contributor.authorSampson, H
dc.date.accessioned2017-10-19T15:13:01Z
dc.date.issued2017-10-19
dc.identifier.issn1363-6820
dc.identifier.issn1747-5090
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10026.1/10076
dc.description.abstract

This paper reports on some of the findings from a study of new technology and training in shipping. It identifies the key significance of motivation in the learning process and identifies potential factors that motivate or demotivate seafarers when undertaking training about new equipment. It shows that seafarers’ motivation is likely to be impacted by confidence that training is good for the job as well as for promotion. It demonstrates that companies can facilitate and encourage individuals to initiate learning activities but that they may equally adopt strategies which discourage learning. Enabling factors include: establishing a positive learning environment; adopting clear policies; allowing seafarers to identify their own training needs and allowing seafarers to request support for specific courses. Conversely, companies may demotivate some seafarers in relation to training by shifting the burden of training ‘costs’, such as time and money, onto them.

dc.format.extent1-15
dc.languageen
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherTaylor & Francis
dc.subjectTraining motivation
dc.subjectshipping
dc.subjectnew technology
dc.subjectinformal learning
dc.titleImproving training outcomes: the significance of motivation when learning about new shipboard technology
dc.typejournal-article
dc.typeArticle
plymouth.issue3
plymouth.volume70
plymouth.publisher-urlhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1080/13636820.2017.1392997
plymouth.publication-statusPublished online
plymouth.journalJournal of Vocational Education and Training
dc.identifier.doi10.1080/13636820.2017.1392997
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Faculty of Arts, Humanities and Business
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Faculty of Arts, Humanities and Business/Plymouth Business School
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/REF 2021 Researchers by UoA
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/REF 2021 Researchers by UoA/UoA17 Business and Management Studies
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Users by role
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Users by role/Academics
dcterms.dateAccepted2017-09-11
dc.rights.embargodate2018-10-19
dc.identifier.eissn1747-5090
dc.rights.embargoperiodNot known
rioxxterms.versionofrecord10.1080/13636820.2017.1392997
rioxxterms.licenseref.urihttp://www.rioxx.net/licenses/all-rights-reserved
rioxxterms.licenseref.startdate2017-10-19
rioxxterms.typeJournal Article/Review


Files in this item

Thumbnail
Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record


All items in PEARL are protected by copyright law.
Author manuscripts deposited to comply with open access mandates are made available in accordance with publisher policies. Please cite only the published version using the details provided on the item record or document. In the absence of an open licence (e.g. Creative Commons), permissions for further reuse of content should be sought from the publisher or author.
Theme by 
Atmire NV