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dc.contributor.authorBarnes, AJ
dc.contributor.authorHanoch, Y
dc.contributor.authorMiron-Shatz, T
dc.contributor.authorOzanne, EM
dc.date.accessioned2017-10-09T14:36:34Z
dc.date.available2017-10-09T14:36:34Z
dc.date.issued2016-09-01
dc.identifier.issn0278-6133
dc.identifier.issn1930-7810
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10026.1/10033
dc.description.abstract

Objective: Risk communication tools can facilitate patients’ understanding of risk information. In this novel study, we examine the hypothesis that risk communication methods tailored to individuals’ preferences can increase risk comprehension. Method: Preferences for breast cancer risk formats, and risk comprehension data were collected using an online survey from 361 women at high risk for breast cancer. Women’s initial preferences were assessed by asking them which of the following risk formats would be the clearest: (a) percentage, (b) frequency, (c) bar graph, (d) pictogram, and (e) comparison to other women. Next, women were presented with 5 different formats for displaying cancer risks and asked to interpret the risk information presented. Finally, they were asked again which risk format they preferred. Results: Initial preferences for risk formats were not associated with risk comprehension scores. However, women with lower risk comprehension scores were more likely to update their risk format preferences after they evaluated risks in different formats. Less numerate women were more likely to prefer graphical rather than numeric risk formats. Importantly, we found that women preferring graphical risk formats had lower risk comprehension in these formats compared to numeric formats. In contrast, women preferring numeric formats performed equally well across formats. Conclusions: Our findings suggest that tailoring risk communication to patient preferences may not improve understanding of medical risks, particularly for less numerate women, and point to the potential perils of tailoring risk communication formats to patient preferences. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2020 APA, all rights reserved)

dc.format.extent1007-1016
dc.format.mediumPrint-Electronic
dc.languageen
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherAmerican Psychological Association (APA)
dc.subjectrisk communication
dc.subjectpatient preferences
dc.subjectbreast cancer
dc.titleTailoring risk communication to improve comprehension: Do patient preferences help or hurt?
dc.typejournal-article
dc.typeArticle
plymouth.author-urlhttps://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27183307
plymouth.issue9
plymouth.volume35
plymouth.publisher-urlhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1037/hea0000367
plymouth.publication-statusPublished
plymouth.journalHealth Psychology
dc.identifier.doi10.1037/hea0000367
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/REF 2021 Researchers by UoA
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/REF 2021 Researchers by UoA/UoA04 Psychology, Psychiatry and Neuroscience
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Research Groups
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Research Groups/Centre for Brain, Cognition and Behaviour (CBCB)
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Research Groups/Centre for Brain, Cognition and Behaviour (CBCB)/Behaviour
dc.publisher.placeUnited States
dcterms.dateAccepted2016-03-16
dc.identifier.eissn1930-7810
dc.rights.embargoperiodNot known
rioxxterms.versionofrecord10.1037/hea0000367
rioxxterms.licenseref.urihttp://www.rioxx.net/licenses/all-rights-reserved
rioxxterms.licenseref.startdate2016-09-01
rioxxterms.typeJournal Article/Review


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