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Abstract

This article examines the affective capacities of sound and its role in the on-going production of social spaces. More specifically, the article seeks to understand the situated nature of sound’s affectivity within particular social-political-material contexts or circumstances. This is developed through a discussion of an empirical case study related to the history of street music: the ‘street music debates’ of Victorian London. The interrelation here of the sounds street musicians made, the broader urban soundscape of the time, who played street music and who it was that found themselves listening to this music demonstrate clearly the situated affective capacities of street music. From this, the article advocates an understanding of the role of sound in the on-going production of social spaces based upon a reciprocal mediation between ‘macropolitical’ matters related to identity and other social formations and the ‘micropolitics’ of the affects that such sound and music bring to bear for those exposed to it.

DOI

10.1177/1474474016649400

Publication Date

2016-07-08

Publication Title

Cultural Geographies

Volume

24

Issue

1

First Page

89

Last Page

109

ISSN

1474-4740

Organisational Unit

School of Geography, Earth and Environmental Sciences

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